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YOUR October peace mail from Sri Lanka

Dear Friends,

I treat many women in our clinic in Hyderfarm in rural Pakistan. I am a doctor and thanks to your kind gifts, Community World Service Asia (CWSA) operates a women’s clinic where I work.

I am writing today to share with you how you are having a life-saving impact on the lives of women here and, in particular, Kesar’s story.

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Kesar visited me in the early stages of her eighth pregnancy. She was complaining of bleeding and was very lethargic.

"Those were very painful moments for me. I started to feel pain in may lower abdomen and had bleeding. This was my third month of my eighth pregnancy and I was very tired and weak, and couldn’t do my household chores or take care of my children. My husband is a farmer and we are very poor so we couldn’t pay for a doctor."

"I had heard of the Maternal, New Born and Child Health (MNCH) clinic that was operated by CWSA so I came here because I would be attended to by a lady doctor and that there would be no charge for the medicine."

I arranged for Kesar to do a complete physical examination for both her and the baby and I discovered that her blood pressure was worryingly low. I used injections while she was there to improve her health and prescribed iron supplements and multivitamins. She went on a course of medicine for the bleeding and I told her she must rest for her baby to be healthy. The clinic also provided her with information on her diet during pregnancy.

Kesar tells me that now her health is improving day by day and the bleeding has stopped. She now sees us on a regular basis for antenatal checks and follow ups.

Without the work of Act for Peace and CWSA, there is no way that she could have received this health care. Firstly, because her family couldn’t afford it, and also it would be difficult for her to see a female doctor, which is culturally significant in this area of Pakistan.

I look forward to meeting her newborn when it arrives safely. From both Kesar and I: “Thank you.”

Dr Sara

 
Download this Peace Mail in pdf

Your support is making a difference:

$1,379 Traditionally, births have taken place at home in rural areas of Pakistan. For women with health issues and difficult pregnancies, the availability of a delivery room in a hospital means they can receive the care they need for a safe birth. Your gifts mean the room is equipped with medicine, birthing equipment, sterilisation machine, blood pressure monitoring, hygiene kits, bedding and towels.

Giving a Gift for Peace is a kind way to show your friends and loved ones that you care. It also shows families around the world that we want to share a little of our abundance with them this Christmas. This year we have a new range of colouring-in card gifts for children. Little ones will enjoy making the card their own while you explain that this Christmas gift is also helping a child in Zimbabwe or Sri Lanka

Gifts for Peace Catalogue

In communities where health awareness and access to health services are limited, your gifts support the work of Community World Service Asia and Act for Peace with a focus on mother and child health care.

 

In many remote areas, cultural barriers prevent women from seeking treatment from male doctors, which can put them at serious risk. Through your gifts, we work to provide the health facilities that women need while still respecting the social norms of the communities where we work. Maternal, New Born and Child Health (MNCH) Centers are established where vaccinations, pre and postnatal care, education on reproductive health and family planning - and in some cases delivery services - are available to patients through qualified female practitioners.

 

Employing female doctors and health staff is critical because it encourages women to attend the clinics and receive health services within their village or community. Further, the female health workers increase awareness in the community about why health care and hygiene are important.

View more Peace Mails

 

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