Thank you for your support!

Thank you for your support!

After fleeing the violence in South Sudan, Kama wants nothing more than to keep her family safe from illness. With your gifts, you have helped give Kama and other refugees like her access to clean water and soap. Thank you.

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Thank you so much for joining with Christians all across Australia to help raise money for the Christmas Bowl appeal.

Your gifts can help provide soap, water and toilets for South Sudanese refugees in Ethiopia to keep them safe from potentially deadly diseases.

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Churches working together

Churches working together

The Christmas Bowl appeal is a cherished tradition among our family of churches in Australia. Every year more than than 2,000 churches from 19 denominations come together to help the world's most vulnerable.

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Over 65 years of the Christmas Bowl

It began on Christmas Day 1949, when a minister named Rev Frank Byatt in Victoria placed a simple empty bowl on the table before him. He humbly asked his friends and family to contribute what they felt the cost of the meal had been.  Rev Byatt asked that they consider their own good fortune in being able to share a Christmas meal together in comfort and safety. And he invited them to share God’s blessings of love and friendship in the form of a gift to people who had fled the horrors of World War Two and were suffering as refugees. - See more at: http://www.actforpeace.org.au/System/Christmas-Bowl/Homepage#sthash.6FNeGEDB.dpuf
It began on Christmas Day 1949, when a minister named Rev Frank Byatt in Victoria placed a simple empty bowl on the table before him. He humbly asked his friends and family to contribute what they felt the cost of the meal had been.  Rev Byatt asked that they consider their own good fortune in being able to share a Christmas meal together in comfort and safety. And he invited them to share God’s blessings of love and friendship in the form of a gift to people who had fled the horrors of World War Two and were suffering as refugees. - See more at: http://www.actforpeace.org.au/System/Christmas-Bowl/Homepage#sthash.6FNeGEDB.dpuf
It began on Christmas Day 1949, when a minister named Rev Frank Byatt in Victoria placed a simple empty bowl on the table before him. He humbly asked his friends and family to contribute what they felt the cost of the meal had been.  Rev Byatt asked that they consider their own good fortune in being able to share a Christmas meal together in comfort and safety. And he invited them to share God’s blessings of love and friendship in the form of a gift to help people who had fled the horrors of World War Two and were suffering as refugees.

This invitation to Australian Christians to stand by men, women and children living through conflict and displacement is, sadly, more important than ever.  For the first time in history, there are nearly 60 million displaced people in the world who need our help.

The Christmas Bowl appeal is our way of forging a loving connection between our Christian community here in Australia and people around the world who are experiencing dreadful hardship and suffering.

Ways to get involved

Your gifts to the Christmas Bowl

Thanks to your generous support, vulnerable families have been able to rebuild their shattered lives and keep their children safe.

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Your Christmas gift to the world

Together we are working for safety, dignity and justice in communities threatened by conflict and disaster. Thanks to your gifts to the Christmas Bowl, Burmese refugees will have enough to eat, Palestinian families in Gaza can now receive the desperately needed medical care and Christians and other groups fleeing persecution in Iraq still have hope.

Helping to grow enough food in Zimbabwe

Right now, families in Zimbabwe are malnourished and face extreme hunger. Around 70 percent of Zimbabwe’s rural population rely on agriculture for their food and income, and have been severely affected in recent years by drought, political violence and economic crises.

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Helping Tongan communities to prepare for and survive disasters

Tonga is made up of 176 small islands. It is the world’s second most at-risk country from natural disasters, including cyclones, earthquakes and tsunamis.

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Giving the children of Burma their lives back

For over a decade, children in Burma (Myanmar) have been recruited to participate in a violent armed conflict between the state and numerous militarised ethnic groups.

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Saving children's lives in Indonesia

Indonesia is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world – but it is the ‘everyday’ disasters routinely faced by the country’s most vulnerable people that cause many preventable deaths.

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Giving girls an education to ensure the future of Afghanistan

Afghanistan’s girls are still fighting for equal access to education. Quality education, in particular for girls, is crucial in any attempt to alleviate poverty and bring about meaningful social change.

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Helping communities recover and rebuild in Vanuatu

Tropical Cyclone Pam was the worst natural disaster to hit Vanuatu in decades. As well as destroying homes, there was little food and water left. Nearly all crops were destroyed. The essential work of rebuilding after the devastation and getting prepared for future disasters is more challenging than ever.

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Providing the children of Gaza with the healthcare they deserve

The healthcare system in Gaza has been under extreme pressure since 2007 due to the ongoing blockade imposed by Israel. Hospitals are overrun with casualties and the poor health system simply cannot handle the burden.

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Helping children keep safe from deadly diseases in Ethiopia

South Sudan is the youngest nation in the world and remains unstable. Recent violence has forced more than 200,000 refugees to flee over the border to Ethiopia to escape the fighting. However refugee camps are full and unsanitary living conditions mean potentially fatal diseases can easily spread.

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Bake cookies for the Christmas Bowl appeal

"I’ve always been a Christmas Bowl supporter. And last year I decided to take it a little further and bake ginger bread men to raise more money.  It was really fun to do it with my kids, and it made me feel really proud. Knowing that the funds I raise will be put to good use makes it even sweeter!” - Jenny

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The Christmas appeal of Act for Peace

Act for Peace is the international aid agency of the National Council of Churches in Australia and a member of the ACT Alliance, a global network of more than 130 Christian organisations, all working together for change.

We believe in a world where every person is free from suffering caused by conflict and natural disasters. Across the world, we work with local communities so they can prepare for emergencies and respond fast to protect the most vulnerable people when disaster hits. We also lobby governments and decision-makers for positive action which promotes peace and supports people affected by conflict and disaster.

  • Jenny Esots, Local organiser

    The Willunga Tree Festival is a great way to support the Christmas Bowl, engage with the community and share the Christmas spirit.

    - Jenny Esots, Local organiser
  • Rev. Jan McLeod, St Nicholas Anglican Church, Sawtell

    I am very proud of the Coffs Coast for rallying behind the purposes of Act for Peace and the Christmas Bowl, in providing support for targeted countries and assisting them to be resilient to global issues.

    - Rev. Jan McLeod, St Nicholas Anglican Church, Sawtell